If you’re interested in why Christians are so confusing, it’s because most don’t know, quite frankly, the basic principles of core Christianity. Your beliefs about Christianity, though, (and even about most world religions, for that matter), are probably profoundly incorrect. You have the right to be apathetic, but you don’t have the right to be needlessly ignorant. Read on if you want to know what I think is going on…

Roger W. Stump, Professor Emeritus at the Department of Geography & Planning at the University at Albany, SUNY, is the author of a unique and compelling text, The Geography of Religion: Faith, Place, and Space. As I continue to read through the text, I find myself reflecting on the themes of secularization and desacralization with increasing frequency. Perhaps the notion of some ambitious (future) project makes me happier than I’d like to admit, but I see fascinating avenues of research ahead of me. Stump’s Geography, along with Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age, would make for a fine analytical framework with which I can approach many concerns my undergraduate honors thesis on French anticlericalism will bring to the surface.

Echo and Narcissus by John William Waterhouse
Echo and Narcissus by John William Waterhouse

The call to worship for some of us in conservative Evangelical circles seems to be the  exaltation of emotionalism, ignorance, and false modesty; nothing more than doctrinal confusion and an unconscious, existential dissatisfaction with the Godhead.

The advocates of the Sexual Purity Movement and their interlocutors cry out, “Jesus, don’t let me die before I’ve had sex,” and not “Heavenly Father, let your will be done.” After listening to an interview for a new documentary on “Evangelical culture” regarding this issue, “GiveMeSexJesus,” I reflected upon my own perspectives on the nature of lust, and what it represents in our contemporary social milieux.